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Is Kanye just as intense in person as he is in interviews?Oh yeah, man. [Laughs.] One hundred percent. When he did the rant at my listening party, it’s funny, I was wondering where it was going to go. But more so than anything—we have very candid conversations, man. I’m talking about relationships to our opinions on rap music or rappers, you know, things we will never say publicly. We have very, very specific candid conversations about a lot of stuff, and then when he starts talking publicly, I’m like, wait a minute, do you really want to say this in front of all these people and all these cameras? That was my biggest worry. I love the brash arrogance of Kanye. I mean, we’re rappers, that’s what we’re supposed to like, right? I love that he talks like that. So that wasn’t a big thing to me. But my biggest thing was that I don’t know if I want to let people know our thoughts—me and Kanye—outside of the raps, you know what I’m saying?
Why?Not deserving. People aren’t deserving of that. People are so two-faced. It’s cool, and I can accept that, I just would rather have those conversations in house. I mean, it wasn’t a bad thing. This particular rant wasn’t anything crazy. But for the majority of those type of expressive moments, I’d rather not let people hear it.
Is it weird being famous?Not to me. I’m not super famous. I’m regular famous. I’m like low-budget famous. Poverty famous. This is poverty fame. [Laughs.] Poverty fame is where I can get into the club—the hip-hop club—with my friends and they’ll give me a table and a bottle. One bottle. One poverty bottle. Not two. Not five. We’re drinking one poverty bottle. But there’s not paparazzi. I’m not paparazzi famous, so it’s not that weird.
It gets a little funny with my mom. I don’t like people talking to my mom. I don’t like any writer talking to my mom. I don’t like people leaving notes on her car at home. I don’t like people talking to her at church. I don’t like people telling her that her son’s in the Illuminati. It’s like, who is saying this? My mom is mid-60s, and I can’t deal with that. That’s a bother. But outside of that, I’m not trippin’.
—We interviewed Pusha T., who is “regular famous”

Is Kanye just as intense in person as he is in interviews?
Oh yeah, man. [Laughs.] One hundred percent. When he did the rant at my listening party, it’s funny, I was wondering where it was going to go. But more so than anything—we have very candid conversations, man. I’m talking about relationships to our opinions on rap music or rappers, you know, things we will never say publicly. We have very, very specific candid conversations about a lot of stuff, and then when he starts talking publicly, I’m like, wait a minute, do you really want to say this in front of all these people and all these cameras? That was my biggest worry. I love the brash arrogance of Kanye. I mean, we’re rappers, that’s what we’re supposed to like, right? I love that he talks like that. So that wasn’t a big thing to me. But my biggest thing was that I don’t know if I want to let people know our thoughts—me and Kanye—outside of the raps, you know what I’m saying?

Why?
Not deserving. People aren’t deserving of that. People are so two-faced. It’s cool, and I can accept that, I just would rather have those conversations in house. I mean, it wasn’t a bad thing. This particular rant wasn’t anything crazy. But for the majority of those type of expressive moments, I’d rather not let people hear it.

Is it weird being famous?
Not to me. I’m not super famous. I’m regular famous. I’m like low-budget famous. Poverty famous. This is poverty fame. [Laughs.] Poverty fame is where I can get into the club—the hip-hop club—with my friends and they’ll give me a table and a bottle. One bottle. One poverty bottle. Not two. Not five. We’re drinking one poverty bottle. But there’s not paparazzi. I’m not paparazzi famous, so it’s not that weird.

It gets a little funny with my mom. I don’t like people talking to my mom. I don’t like any writer talking to my mom. I don’t like people leaving notes on her car at home. I don’t like people talking to her at church. I don’t like people telling her that her son’s in the Illuminati. It’s like, who is saying this? My mom is mid-60s, and I can’t deal with that. That’s a bother. But outside of that, I’m not trippin’.

—We interviewed Pusha T., who is “regular famous”

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